KY 3.0 hours Floods and other Natural Hazards - Course Syllabus


Course Syllabus:

3.0 Kentucky Law

Anywhere it rains, it can flood. A flood is a general and temporary condition where two or more acres of normally dry land or two or more properties are inundated by water or mudflow. Many conditions can result in a flood: hurricanes, overtopped levees, outdated or clogged drainage systems and rapid accumulation of rainfall.

Just because you haven't experienced a flood in the past, doesn't mean you won't in the future. Flood risk isn't just based on history; it's also based on many factors: rainfall, river-flow and tidal-surge data, topography, flood-control measures, and changes due to building and development.

Flood insurance covers overflow of inland or tidal waters and unusual and rapid accumulation or runoff of surface waters from any source. Although flood insurance specifically excludes wind and hail damage, the good news is that most homeowner’s insurance provides such coverage.

This course aids the real estate professional by discussing the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). The National Flood Insurance Program is a voluntary program based on an agreement between the federal government and the local community. In exchange for adopting and enforcing a floodplain management ordinance in compliance with federal and state laws, federally backed flood insurance is made available to property owners throughout the community.